jueves, 27 de enero de 2011

ORACLE Racing: AC45 Production in Warkworth


Not really sure what Matthew and his mates are up to, but he definately sounds excited!!

ORACLE Racing: Eye in the sky - aerial shots of the AC45

ORACLE Racing: Back on Track


Testing sessions resume on the AC45 on Tuesday following a few days of stormy weather in Auckland. And the old guard do a 'fly past' of the new generation, showing the way.

miércoles, 26 de enero de 2011

Banque Populaire - Trophée Jules Verne - Day 4


Still ripping its way south!!

OFFICIAL DATES OF 34TH AMERICA’S CUP RELEASED

WHAT:
The 2013 race dates for the Louis Vuitton Cup and America’s Cup Match (Finals) were confirmed today by Regatta Director Iain Murray.

Since 1983, the Louis Vuitton Cup – the America’s Cup Challenger Series – has been held when more than one Challenger is vying for the right to race the Defender for the America’s Cup (as is the case for the 34th America’s Cup). The role of the Louis Vuitton Cup is twofold – not only to select the best Challenger, but also to help prepare that the team to race successfully against the Defender in the America’s Cup Match (Finals).

The winner of the Louis Vuitton Cup will race the Golden Gate Yacht Club’s (GGYC) defending team in the finals, a first-to-win-five (best of nine) race series known as the America’s Cup Match (Finals).

WHEN:
Louis Vuitton Cup: 13 July – 1 September 2013*
America’s Cup Match (Finals): 7-22 September 2013**

WHO:
Under the Protocol Governing the America’s Cup, GGYC as the Defending Club has the responsibility to select the dates.

The official notice of these dates to the currently entered six teams, and other prospective teams, from Regatta Director Iain Murray is now available atwww.americascup.com under the Gallery section.

WHERE:
San Francisco Bay

Foncia retire from the race

The report was sent from Foncia’s Michel Desjoyeaux and François Gabart at 0659hrs this Wedenesday morning.

“ On January 26th 2011 at 0240hrs UTC positioned at 41°12,6 S and 8°59,8 E Foncia was sailing a course of 115 degrees at an average of 18 knots under Solent and one reef with the wind at 140 degree blowing at 25-30 knots, wind swell, and had the same conditions for around eight hours.

The mast broke above the solent hound, in other words around 25 metres above the deck (27.3m long tube). The rigging is still up held in place by the lower shrouds, the runners, the staysail stay and main jib stay. The broken sectiont is hanging down at 20m up and is still held in place by the halyards. The solent, unfurled, because in use when the damage occurred was twisted around the whole mast.

The mainsail is held by its halyard at the third reef. Everything has stayed on board, nothing lost overboard. I can’t hide our disappointment, but we are healthy except I have a little pain in my right thumb which I got when I was trying to get the Solent under control.

We do not ask for any assistance. We are currently trying to head for Cape Town under sail, around 600 miles off. Our current speed is 11 knots course 76 deg. The forecasts for the next few days show no risk (today 25 to 30 knots from the S, weakening and clocking W). In two days the passage of the anticyclone (bringing light winds). If the seas are slight then maybe we will have the chance to climb the mast to recover the pieces and to be able to drop the mainsail. After that we should see 20-25 knots from the SE in to Cape Town.

Our ETA Cape Town then should be 30th or 31st January. We retire from the Barcelona World Race.”

martes, 25 de enero de 2011

lunes, 24 de enero de 2011

Ice

Aurora



The ABC's Karen Barlow is surrounded by a landscape of icy sculptures as the Aurora Australis enters Antarctic waters. This is a good reason why the BWR ice gates have been moved further north.

Banque Populaire - Trophée Jules Verne - Day 1 - 23 Jan 2011


Wild !!

domingo, 16 de enero de 2011

First sail for the AC45





Maiden sail for the AC45. Auckland, 16 January 2011. Photo copyright Gilles Martin-Raget / America's Cup

Maiden sail for the AC45. Auckland, 16 January 2011. Photo copyright Gilles Martin-Raget / America's Cup

Maiden sail for the AC45. Auckland, 16 January 2011. Photo copyright Gilles Martin-Raget / America's Cup

[Source: America's Cup] Auckland’s Viaduct Harbour showcased a glimpse into the future of the America’s Cup with the debut of the wing-sailed AC45 catamaran. The forerunner to the next generation of America’s Cup boats, the AC45 made its maiden voyage, the first of many sea trials planned over the coming weeks.

“Thanks to the efficiency of the New Zealand boat building industry and a huge effort by our team, the first AC45 is now ready for sea trials just a mere four months after this exciting new multihull class was first conceptualized,” said Tim Smyth, co-construction manager for Core Builders Composites of Warkworth, New Zealand.

AC45 Wing-Sailed Catamaran Under Sail in Auckland

Auckland’s Viaduct Harbour showcased a glimpse into the future of the America’s Cup with the debut of the wing-sailed AC45 catamaran. The forerunner to the next generation of America’s Cup boats, the AC45 made its maiden voyage, the first of many sea trials planned over the coming weeks.

“Thanks to the efficiency of the New Zealand boat building industry and a huge effort by our team, the first AC45 is now ready for sea trials just a mere four months after this exciting new multihull class was first conceptualized,” said Tim Smyth, co-construction manager for Core Builders Composites of Warkworth, New Zealand.

The AC45 will be the centerpiece of the 2011-2012 America’s Cup World Series, which will start mid-2011. The high-tech carbon fibre catamaran is the first in a fleet of the new 45-foot one-designs that will be tested by America’s Cup teams before racing on the America’s Cup World Series circuit.

The AC45 is an essential element of the vision for the 34th America’s Cup, which will feature 72-foot catamarans raced on San Francisco Bay in 2013. Focused on creating more on-the-water excitement for both the teams and the fans, the AC45 is designed for both speed and close racing. While capable of closing speeds of up to 30 knots, the AC45 was designed to remain nimble enough to handle the tight race courses planned by America’s Cup Race Management (ACRM).

“The biggest challenge with multihulls is learning how much to anticipate. With the AC45 being a big, powerful multihull capable of tripling the wind speed, your reactions and skills are accelerated. It’s all about being ahead of the cycle,” said ORACLE RACING skipper James Spithill. “I think the AC45 will enable all teams to advance to hard-core race mentality very quickly.”

The AC45 was designed by the ORACLE RACING design and engineering team, which developed the catamaran on behalf of the America’s Cup community. At task was designing a boat that would not only meet the racing criteria, but could also fit inside a 40-foot container, which is the shipping vessel for the America’s Cup World Series.

“The boat was designed for all-around performance so it can be sailed in wide range of conditions, and that means the next America's Cup will see races start on time,” said Ian Burns, ORACLE RACING design coordinator. “Plus it’s a regatta boat, meant for lots of racing, so quick assembly and disassembly was a must to accommodate an active competition schedule.”

The AC45 had to be robust enough to sail through a wide wind range, from 5 to 30 knots, as well as survive in the event of collisions, which are foreseen as teams learn to adapt to multihull closing speeds.

Utilizing the same technology used in the aerospace industry, the hulls are built in carbon epoxy with honeycomb cores, making them extremely stiff and light structures. The sandwich construction involves two carbon skins less than 1mm thick laminated over an ultra-light honeycomb core.

“The new America’s Cup is for those who are hungry for a challenge and the AC45 is really a fresh take on the multihull,” said Vincenzo Onorato, President, Mascalzone Latino.

“We plan to run tight race courses that will force boats to engage with each other, creating really close racing situations. Multihulls are very fast boats and will therefore reach the course boundaries sooner, so races will become a true test of skill and strategy, not just speed,” said Iain Murray, CEO, America’s Cup Race Management and Regatta Director. “The AC45 will fast-track teams to state-of-the-art wingsail technology and crew technique in the first season, and will greatly prepare them for the AC72.”

Specifications:

LOA: 44.13’ (13.45m)
BEAM:22.6’ (6.9m)
DSPL:1,400 kg
Mast Height:70.5’ (21.5m)
Sail Area:1430 sq’ (133 sqm) (up w/main & gennaker), 2,259 sq’ 210 (sqm) (dwn w/main & reacher)

AC45 Splashdown!


The AC45 splashed today in Auckland's Viaduct Harbour to a round of applause from the impromptu crowd as the wing-sailed catamaran was lifted overhead and into the water for the first time.

AC45 Wing Sail Time Elapse

AC 45 launched

'Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. 16/1/2011' Chris Cameron

Top international photographer, Chris Cameron, was on hand to capture the launch of the prototype AC45 in Auckland's Viaduct Harbour, a day ahead of schedule. The AC45 is the forerunner to the AC72 which will be used in the 34th America's Cup. The 45ft long yacht will feature a wingsail, the same as the larger 72ft yacht to be used in the September 2013 Match in San Francisco.

The AC45 has been under construction at the Core Composites facility in Warkworth, 40 minutes north of Auckland. The prototype will be assembled in the old Team New Zealand building at the Viaduct harbour, ahead of the provisional launch date of 17th January 2011.

Each team will be required to own at least one of the AC45 yachts which will be used for competition in the new America's Cup World Series of 13 regattas which will precede the 34th America's Cup.

For more images from Chris Cameron click here

16/01/2011 - Auckland (NZL) - 34th America’s Cup - AC45 finalization - Gilles Martin-Raget-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

16/01/2011 - Auckland (NZL) - 34th America’s Cup - AC45 finalization - Gilles Martin-Raget-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

A runner fitting fails during the rigging of the first AC45. Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. That is Murray Jones of ex Alinghi fame with the EC6 fitting in his hand! Murray was very much involved with his own brand of carbon rigging whilst in Switzerland. 16/1/2011 - Chris Cameron

Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. 16/1/2011 - Chris Cameron

Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. 16/1/2011 - Chris Cameron

Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. 16/1/2011 - Chris Cameron

Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. 16/1/2011 - Chris Cameron

Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. 16/1/2011 - Chris Cameron

Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. 16/1/2011 - Chris Cameron

Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. 16/1/2011 - Chris Cameron

Oracle Racing rig and float the first AC45 in Auckland. 16/1/2011 - Chris Cameron

16/01/2011 - Auckland (NZL) - 34th America’s Cup - AC45 finalization - Gilles Martin-Raget-www.americascup.com

Ainhoa arrives in NZ





Brad arrives to Wellington






Ainhoa Sanchez catches some shots of Brad shortly before his arrival into Wellington, from the helicopter! She really takes great shots.

sábado, 15 de enero de 2011

New BWR leader


The crew of Estrella Damm lead the BWR fleet into the southern hemisphere - taking full advantage of the pit stops of the earlier race leaders.

AC 45 takes shape


Foto copyright Gilles Martin-Raget

Foto copyright Gilles Martin-Raget

Foto copyright Gilles Martin-Raget

Foto copyright Gilles Martin-Raget

Foto copyright Gilles Martin-Raget

Foto copyright Gilles Martin-Raget

Foto copyright Gilles Martin-Raget



Foncia underway again



First in to Récife and first out, Foncia returned to the race course this evening after an 18 hours stopover to repair the sacrificial crash box on the bow of the VPLP/Verdier designed IMOCA Open 60.

Michel Desjoyeaux and François Gabart arrived at 2330hrs (UTC) last night and left the dock at 1740hrs (UTC).
According to the technical team repairs went well. The foam was largely intact and so required some new carbon and lamination, effectively with a new nose ready to take on the race course again.
Foncia is reported to have set off again in winds of around 12 knots, ready to take on their next challenge, the Saint Helena anticyclone. Desjoyeaux and Gabart restart in fifth position more than 160 miles behind race leader Estrella Damm.

The Virbac-Paprec team were expecting to be heading back to the race course around 2015hrs (UTC). Their repairs were reported to have gone well although some supplementary work was required to repair damage to the bracing support for the main sheet track caused by the jury mainsheet anchoring set up by Jean-Pierre Dick and Loïck Peyron.
“ Work went well in spite of the additional work caused by the fortune set up by JP and Loïck which sheared the support for the carbon sheet track. Julien and Philippe repaired that but the resin does not dry well in the humid equatorial climate. Jean-Yves, Bruno and I replaced the new track. Jean-Pierre and Loïck left to rest before heading back out to sea around the start of the evening.” Said shore team member Nicolas

Estrella Damm leads into the third Sunday of the race by 118 miles from MAPFRE.
In eighth GAES Centros Auditivos is less than 2 miles ahead of Renault ZE Sailing Team. They have Neutrogena34.7 miles ahead, but Hugo Boss is now 84 niles behind them.

jueves, 13 de enero de 2011

AC 45 construction photos

'Construction of the AC45 catamaran wingsail' Ivor Wilkins/www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo
Construction of the AC45 catamaran wingsail - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran wingsail - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran - beam finishing - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran - wingsail - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran - platform - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran - wingsail - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran - factory floor - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran - wingsail - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran - wingsail - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran - wingsail - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo

Construction of the AC45 catamaran - platform - Ivor Wilkins-www.americascup.com Click Here to view large photo







Coming soon ...?

miércoles, 12 de enero de 2011

Fifth challenger officially confirmed?

[Source: America's Cup] “What a great way to start off the new year, with our official host city San Francisco in place and now the announcement of our sixth entry,” said Iain Murray, Regatta Director for the 34th America’s Cup and CEO of America’s Cup Race Management (ACRM). “I’m looking forward to having more good news to share, with the launch of the first AC45 later this month.”

This sixth entry joins previously announced challenges from Italy (Mascalzone Latino), France (ALEPH), and Sweden (Artemis Racing). A fourth challenger has been accepted but has yet to disclose any details of its entry, while ORACLE RACING from the United States has been accepted as a defender candidate by the Golden Gate Yacht Club.

Nearly 160 years old, the America’s Cup has become one of the world’s leading sporting competitions. Focused on creating a new era for the America’s Cup, the America’s Cup Event Authority is transforming the event for media and online broadcasting to deliver an enhanced viewer experience.

In addition, ACRM is transforming the on-the-water experience through the introduction of elements that will deliver unparalleled racing competition, including new course formats, racing rules and the wing-sailed AC72 catamaran, a groundbreaking new boat design.

Mapfre making miles

The strong trade winds and high speeds south from the Canary islands have taken a toll on the Barcelona World Race leading group as Jean Le Cam and Bruno Dubois head for the Cape Verde islands this afternoon after losing the mast of their IMOCA Open 60 Président 83 miles NW of Santo Antao at around 1930 last night. The duo lost the entire rig and had to cut sails free.


After hitting some type of floating object which has damaged the crash box on the bow of Foncia which they noticed on Sunday, Michel Desjoyeaux and Francois Gabart confirmed this morning that they are preparing to make a technical stop in Brasil, probably in Recife to repair or replace the sacrificial section which served its purpose, preventing damage to the hull.

Speeds have dropped now for the leaders who keep pressing hard down towards the Doldrums, but who will be taking the chance to re-group, to recharge their energies after three seemingly endless days and nights of on-the-edge sailing. For the leading duo the passage across the Doldrums looks to be relatively straightforward, and they will start to feel the effects of the convergence zone this evening. The slow-down for the leaders might be scarcely noticeable and last around 24-36 hours.
Leader Virbac-Paprec 3 might even expect to be sliding into the southern hemisphere, across the Equator by Wednesday evening around 1800-1900hrs.

The top half of the fleet have a time window of around 48 hours to get down to the Doldrums, but then as the Trade Winds in the north start to diminish, the light winds convergence zone spreads north and the later arrivals might lose up to another half a day or so, on the leading pack.

The technical stopover for Desjoyeaux and Gabart, expected to be in Recife this Friday, is expected to be relatively straightforward, and requires a detour which is not too far off the course considering the present position of the St Helena high pressure system which presses the fleet closer to the Brazilian coast. The ‘nose job’ procedure could take as little as four hours to complete with the boat required to be lifted out of the water.

But for Le Cam and his Catalan co-skipper, the prospects are much bleaker.
The French skipper might be more battle scarred, hardened by the slings and arrows of misfortune on the oceans over his 25 year career than the full time cardiologist Garcia, but both were putting a stoic, brave face on their fate.Garcia, whose childhood dream of racing round the world looks to be over for the moment, said:

“I’m touched by it. I have thought about it all night. But there is nothing either of us can do about it. Life is like this. Sometimes you just have to take it.”

“I never expected this at all.”

Messages of solidarity and support were received by the President duo, not least the practical advice from Alex Pella, Garcia’s fellow Barcelones skipper who offered a list of personal advice, having had to stop there after losing the mast of his Mini in 2007, not least to enjoy the Portuguese beer and pizzas in the yacht club.

While Jean-Pierre Dick and Loïck Peyron extended their lead to 83.2 miles this afternoon over Foncia, Spain’s Olympic duo Iker Martinez and Xabi Fernandez proved the quickest in the fleet, sailing 424 miles in 24 hours, the greatest distance yet in this edition of the Barcelona World Race. They are up to fourth place now, passing Mirabaud,and are just 40 miles behind their third placed compatriots on Estrella Damm, Pepe Ribes and Alex Pella.

The route for the looks set to narrow and become trickier over the next few days.

Jan 11 Summary of the day (English version)


martes, 11 de enero de 2011

lunes, 10 de enero de 2011

Président dismasts

Président dismasts off Cape Verde

Jean Le Cam warned at 20:25 (French time), the race director of the Barcelona World Race that today Monday, January 10, 2011, the boat Président lost her mast. Jean Le Cam and his Spanish teammate Bruno Garcia are on board and safe.

The incident happened while the yacht was positioned 18 º 03 ‘N / 26 º 14′ W and was sailing at a speed between 16 and 20 knots. The boat crashed into a wave and the mast broke.

Michel Ollivier (technical director) and the race directors are in constant contact with the boat and can confirm that the two skippers have not requested any assistance. Both are currently on board and under engine will cover the 83 miles that separate them from San Antao Island, the most northerly of the Archipelago of Cape Verde.

Weather conditions currently at the area are north-easterly wind blowing at 19 knots, with short seas.